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Toby Feltwell Interview in Sex Magazine

April 4, 2014 – 17:46 in Fashion | Calum

Toby Feltwell Interview in Sex Magazine

Toby Feltwell has been instrumental in some of your most cherished memories within music and clothing and even if you knew it – you probably never fully appreciated it. Starting out as a young kid who hung about Slam City Skates, like so many others who went on to achieve greatness within this small realm of what we consider to be cool, Toby then went on to work with Mowax and Bape. Indeed, he was instrumental in the Japanese brand’s overseas operations and a key cog in the working relationship between Pharrell, Nigo , which spawned Billionaire Boys Club. Yet, he does not command the same levels of adoration of the aforementioned duo, largely due to the fact that he has eschewed the limelight for much of his career. His story, however, is certainly fascinating and recently Sex Magazine caught up with him for a rare interview.

Today, Feltwell is the main driving force behind Cav Empt – arguably the most intriguing brand within streetwear in the past five years. Working alongside his Bape and BBC collaborator and friend, Sk8thing, Cav Empt have fed us the idea that it is ok to be new, rather than pursuing some mawkish 80s or 90s nostalgia for kids who were never there. Cav Empt feels global, founded by the internet and draws upon a host of both high and lowbrow references; juxtaposing them in such a manner that each garment is both thought-provoking and aesthetically pleasing. It was interesting to glean further knowledge about the Japanese brand which has cloaked itself in mystery, save for a handful of interviews.

Here’s an except:

Caveat Emptor means “buyer beware” right?


Yeah. When I told some lawyer friends I was starting a brand called CE for Caveat Emptor, they thought it was a brilliant, because it’s a legal concept really. The basic position of commerce before consumer laws impose more obligations on the seller, meaning if you’re buying something, then it’s up to you to make sure you’re getting what you’re buying. It’s a basic position of common law that’s been modified to protect consumers over the years and has a heap of meanings when you apply it to a brand.

The marking CE is also ubiquitous. It’s on the back of my phone.

That CE mark is a safety standard allows goods to be imported into the European Community. Now that the world is a global marketplace, everybody wants to sell their products in Europe, but they have to comply to certain safety regulations and a CE mark shows that they’re compliant. We like the idea of reverse adopting all these other products that are everywhere. You don’t notice until somebody points it out and then you start seeing it everywhere.

Read the full thing here. 

Fashion
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6876 x Mamnick Eyam Jacket

April 1, 2014 – 21:43 in Fashion | Calum

6876 x Mamnick Eyam Jacket

The fusion of design sensibilities – particularly that of differing aesthetics – is never easy to achieve. How do you create something indicative of what we have come to expect from both parties, without it jarring? Sometimes, collaborative output fails because of that very dilemma. In other cases, such problems matter less and often owe their success to a deep understanding of their collaborative partner despite juxtaposed styles. This is certainly true of the latest iteration of Kenneth Mckenzie’s Black Project, which sees his 6876 brand working with Sheffield-based Mamnick. The distinctive cape style jacket combines McKenzie’s modernist, utilitarian design ethos with the craftsmanship and heritage-led nuances of the collaborator. It is heartening to see British-designed and made product being executed well.

The Jacket comes in a package that includes a limited Mamnick x 6876 trouser clip and information booklet.

View more info here. 

Fashion
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Ombré Interiors | Why Marc Newson Might Just Be Stumped.

March 28, 2014 – 18:06 in Design | Milly

Ombré Interiors | Why Marc Newson Might Just Be Stumped.

Spoiler alert, I am one of them there lady types. Worse than that, I’m a lady type with a relatively long, mildly glossy mane. It doesn’t compete with that pretty pooch Lassie’s enviable lengths, but my boyfriend has given the green light to being seen with me in public, so progress has clearly been made from my teenage mop (within which, witnesses have suggested, actual birds genuinely nested).

But I digress, what I will say is that I am more than a little familiar with ombré. It has graced the perfectly preened crowns of celebrities galore, as well as masses of us lowly common-folk, for well over a year now.

As demonstrated by a plethora of beautifully trend indulgent interiors, styles regularly translate from fashion and beauty to art and design. However, until the ever gloriously glossy Elle Decoration landed on my desk this morning (with a thumping weight not seen since my days as a brutally violent older sister), I was entirely unaware that ombré had made the journey from transient box-dye adventure of the experimental teenager to the cream of the interiors retail crop.

It is only logical really. Traditionally classic brands such as Ercol and Minotti are grasping, with a significantly intensified sense of urgency, for keys to a door behind which is kept their next significantly wealthy demographic. With online media platforms providing the social insight of a microscope pointed at Google maps, the young, beautiful and wealthy are no longer only classified by their height weight and education, but by their choice of interior stylist, the elegantly crafted tale behind their furniture and the source of the curtains they hide behind.

Consequently, designers are striving for trends that transcend platforms and are relatable to those who haven’t spent thirty-five years dedicated to their loyalty for a particular architect or designer. Show Kendal Jenner a classically elegant B&B Italia sofa next to the fantastically functional, yet stunning, 2014 Dandy sofa from RODA and it’s likely that she’ll experience, understandably, an entire lack of mental fireworks. However, show her the original Ercol benches next to the brand’s contemporary same product update, featuring a variety of ‘dip-dye’ finishes, and she’ll subconsciously recognise a movement in the design market, a progression of more youthful trends and, most significantly, she will relate her own taste in ombré hair to the equally lovely ombré surface.

Yesterday Dezeen published an interview where, market leading industrial designer, Marc Newson accused the design industry of being ‘really pathetic’ and threw heavy criticism in the direction of designers and brands navigating furniture fairs such as the biggest, Milan. (Where I will be in two weeks, at my brand’s €1 000 000 collection preview)

Well Mr Newson, Ercol have managed to re-birth century-old furniture designs in a way that can build a relationship with Kendal Jenner’s hair (and Amex card) based on relative trends, so I suppose the real mystery lies in my next question:

Marc Newson, where are you going wrong?

 

Design
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Defending Bucket Hats At Every Turn

March 28, 2014 – 17:56 in Fashion | Calum

Defending Bucket Hats At Every Turn

I’m predisposed to defend bucket hats at every turn. I think I donned my first bucket hat at the age three, and I don’t mean this in a sort of ‘look what I trendsetter I am’ way, more of a ‘look how incredibly pale I am, I’m about three shades up from albino on a dulux chart’ tip. And yes, I guess if I was some asshole trend reporter, I’d say that bucket hats were definitely “in” right now. Thankfully, we have the occasionally informative but perpetually sanctimonious folks at Vice to keep us in the loop. You see, their reporter went to a gig and spotted a lot of bucket hats. He took pictures too, you can see them here.

Aside from the ridiculous notion that this is somehow newsworthy, the dismissive quip about “teenagers who start spending their dish-washing money on overpriced sweat-shop fabric,” is not only massively patronising, but also underlines the kind of attitude which spawned the Vice is Hip twitter account. What’s even more odd, is that it was penned by someone who stated he was “unversed in brands” in the previous paragraph, yet seems to have a firm handle on teenage buying habits and the chosen manufacturing location of each brand. Teenagers are always going to subscribe to trends, spotting one isn’t particularly difficult and meeting it with totally unjustified derision is borderline sad.

Then there’s the headline about Yung Lean popularising bucket hats in a similar manner to Mac Miller and snapbacks. I must have missed that. Geordie Shore and their ilk, maybe, but the Pittsburgh rapper? Come on, son. You could have opted for Tyler, the Creator and five panels, that would have at least made sense for the bullshit trend report that was about to follow. If you’re going to make ridiculous generalisations, at least aim for some semblance of accuracy.

Essentially, it amounts to shoddy journalism; most likely because the writer’s interview with a Swedish teenager was far from illuminating. More importantly, however, it further emphasised why Vice almost always misses the mark when it comes to fashion. Only when going on to their fashion section to confirm that it is indeed shit, did I find the article entitled, “Meeting London’s Normcore Elite: We took to the streets to investigate the world’s most exciting new youth subculture.” There comes a point when trying to be painfully cool and self-aware, whilst also lacking basic knowledge in a certain field, just leaves you looking like a bit of a dick.

It’s been a minute since I’ve felt compelled to write stuff like this. It feels good to be back on my soapbox and getting annoyed about shit that doesn’t really matter. Have a good weekend everyone, I’m off to see Yung Lean.

Fashion
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